Should North Korea be left to their own design?

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Should North Korea be left to their own design?
  Yes
  No
Should South Korea be given a join access to a few nuclear weapons to deter the North Koreans? Should we let the South Asians issue left alone? This is not a grand question. this is what the left-wing presidential candidate most likely to win wants US to do. So, Shoudl we be the policemen of the world or not? Here is what the Weekly Standard Reported. South Korea is likely to elect a left-wing president on May 9. This near certainty, however, has had the benefit of clarifying things: The race's ...Read this
Should South Korea be given a join access to a few nuclear weapons to deter the North Koreans? Should we let the South Asians issue left alone? This is not a grand question. this is what the left-wing presidential candidate most likely to win wants US to do. So, Shoudl we be the policemen of the world or not? Here is what the Weekly Standard Reported. South Korea is likely to elect a left-wing president on May 9. This near certainty, however, has had the benefit of clarifying things: The race's most conservative candidate, Hong Jun-pyo, has just delivered a remarkably provocative speech in accepting his party's nomination. Let's just say there will be no pivot to the center for Mr. Hong. Hong calls himself a "resolute strongman"—indicating he looks back fondly at the time that South Korea was governed as a military dictatorship. (The country first held free elections in 1987.) But Hong says the time is right for such an approach. "The leaders of the four great powers surrounding our country—Trump in the United States, Abe in Japan, Xi Jinping in China and Putin in Russia—are all far right-wing nationalists," he avers. "If a fragile left-wing administration takes office on May 9th in the midst of a far-right nationalist movement sweeping the world, the Republic of Korea will be entering a dark tunnel with no end in sight." Hong sees the North Korea issue clearly, or at least more clearly than the legions of think tank scribblers—most of whom have the luxury of living in Washington, 6,000 miles away from the rogue regime—who promote "engagement" with Pyongyang. "While we have been trying for 20 years to find a diplomatic solution to the North Korean nuclear issue through the six-party talks, North Korea's nuclear technology development has neared completion," he says. And his solution? "I will promptly enter into negotiations with the United States to redeploy tactical nuclear weapons on the Korean peninsula. ... I will immediately initiate negotiations with the United States to redeploy nuclear weapons and provide shared control over the nuclear switch." The United States pulled its tactical nuclear weapons from South Korea in 1991, and as recently as last year, a U.S. envoy rejected calls from South Korean conservatives to redeploy them. Of course, that was back when Barack Obama was president. Donald Trump, by contrast, famously said he would be "fine" with South Korea going nuclear. While Hong is unlikely to win, he's brought this issue back into the discourse—and so the U.S. Senate is not the only place where a certain nuclear option is being discussed. Close this
Asked - 3:03 pm - May 3 2017
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