Should America turn toward being a welfare socialist country?

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Should America turn toward being a welfare socialist country?
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During the primaries Bernie Sanders taked about socialism and there was an outcry not just from the right but also from the center left that the idea was impractical for America. But in the days since, there has been a steady growth in demands for socailist values to be appreciated and promoted by a right wing government. But is the way to go for America? In the first Democratic debate, Sen. Bernie Sanders was asked to explain "democratic socialism." His response was, "I think we should look to...Read this
During the primaries Bernie Sanders taked about socialism and there was an outcry not just from the right but also from the center left that the idea was impractical for America. But in the days since, there has been a steady growth in demands for socailist values to be appreciated and promoted by a right wing government. But is the way to go for America? In the first Democratic debate, Sen. Bernie Sanders was asked to explain "democratic socialism." His response was, "I think we should look to countries like Denmark, like Sweden and Norway." So, when we look there what do we get? We see less economic inequality and more concern for the well-being of citizens. Let's look at some details. Whereas in the United States, federal law allows people to take three months of unpaid parental leave, Swedish law gives new parents a combined 16 months of leave that they can use however they want during the first 8 years of their child's life. The law also entitles parents to receive 80% of their wages during leave. In average life expectancy, the U.S. is behind more than 30 countries. Spain, which boasts one of the best health care systems in the world, has a single-payer universal health care model. Switzerland, France, Norway, Sweden and Finland -- which have government-funded universal health care -- also rank higher than the U.S. In the U.S., the average CEO makes 354 times more money than the average worker. In Germany, one of the world's leading economies, CEOs make only 147 times more than workers -- which is still a lot, but less than double the rate in the U.S. Why is Germany less unequal? Because labor representatives and workers sit on corporate boards. That means when issues of pay come up, there are people in positions of power to speak up for workers' salaries and not just CEO and shareholder interests. It's no wonder that the average worker income in Germany is 16% greater than the average income in the U.S. When you learn the details, democratic socialism looks pretty good, doesn't it? Well, this what Sally Kohn wrote on CNN website. What do you think. Was she right? Close this
Asked - 11:30 am - Jun 24 2017
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